How well does a Rycote Softie Duo-Lyre Mount with Pistol Grip kill unwanted sound?

As UK-based Rycote is the industry-standard specialist in shock & wind protection for field production sound, I took their Softie Duo-Lyre Mount with pistol grip handle to the test with the Deity S-Mic 2. The microphone came with only a basic plastic mount that I suspected to transmit all the vibrations and bumps it could possibly suffer from common, daily usage.

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7 steps to successful measuring of colour temperature of a speed light with the Illuminati light meter for iOS

The Illuminati light meter (links to review) is a Bluetooth light meter – in fact, it's the only Bluetooth one on the market so far – that you control through an app on an iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. The app is also available on Android, but as I only have an iOS device I'm going to …

DxO Photolab 2, vastly improved

In the final week of October, DxO Labs released its newest version of Photolab. The app has been improved overall but the main features worth a closer look are ClearView Plus, advanced colour management, spot weighted corrections, U-Point functionality and PhotoLibrary.

The Deity S-Mic 2, a professional-grade shotgun microphone

Youtubers, wedding video shooters, broadcast sound men/women and filmmakers: they all want to record sound with the best possible results. But practicalities such as pricing often stand in the way of reaching this lofty goal. Yet, equipment that exceeds the basic technical requirements – essential to even think about reaching it – is what you’ll need. A microphone is the first and one of the most important links in the chain from the sound you capture to the audio the viewer/listener gets out of their speakers. The results depend on the whole chain, but if you start with a tin can sound because of a low-end mic, you’ll never get to the full and rich sound you’re after.