Let your logos and other static images swing, pop and move with AddMotion

Adding motion to static components like logos usually means a side trip to After Effects or Motion. FxFactory has made it its business to spare you that trip and enable you to create those effects right in Final Cut Pro X with AddMotion.

Not too long after I received a copy of AddMotion to try out, Red Giant released its own system under the Universe umbrella. The two systems resemble each other, with each having its own strengths and weaknesses. For example, AddMotion doesn’t offer outgoing animation, while Universe’s uni.Logo Motion does, but by cutting up your clip and changing AddMotion’s parameters so the object moves back off-screen, you can make outgoing animations with no additional effort.

Red Giant’s uni.Logo Motion is more complicated to use than AddMotion and comes without instructions. AddMotion comes with an instruction video and is very simple to use. You’ll be creating nice animations much quicker with this plug-in than with Red Giant’s.

Although Red Giant’s Universe plug-in looks more feature complete, AddMotion does offer its own unique features. There’s an Adjustment Layer in the Titles Inspector, for example. That one lets you create animations across clips in the Timeline, making it possible to animate multiple objects simultaneously. Another nice unique feature is the ability to add coloured trails to a moving object within AddMotion — or a motion blur.

Not in Red Giant’s offering, but a great group of animations within the AddMotion category is the dedicated group of 3D text animations in the Title section of Final Cut Pro X’s Inspector.

sponsors made with AddMotion

AddMotion animations

You can pop, swing and move objects with AddMotion. That doesn’t seem like there’s a lot to it, but within those three possible movements, you can create endless variations using duration and scale, a take off and landing method, and depth. The parameters offered make it possible to create animations that happen in 3D space without the need for you to be skilled in this domain.

For example, to make a logo move in as if it comes from above and at a far distance, AddMotion expects you to play with only three to four parameters in order to create a nice and professional animation, while other solutions force you to manipulate double that number.

There is one thing I found amiss with AddMotion and that’s the advice to turn your logos or designs into compound objects to make them work correctly. That’s not entirely right. If we’re talking logos here, it’s better to prepare your artwork in an app like Affinity Photo or Designer first. If you don’t, you’ll end up with blurry artwork.

For my sponsor logos, I used a transparent background of exactly the size of the footage and placed the logo right in the centre. That kept the artwork itself razor sharp while in Final Cut Pro X. I didn’t even need to create a compound clip afterwards. Following the advice from AddMotion’s instructions video, I ended up with some logos looking blurry, others having jagged edges.

The animations themselves look awesome — you can see for yourself on the AddMotion FxFactory page. For €26.25 you get a wonderful animation system for otherwise static artwork.

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