Create complete infographics inside Final Cut Pro X the easy way with mInfographics

MotionVFX developed mInfographics as a set of Final Cut Pro X titles that allow you to turn a video into infographics. mInfographics installs as a plug-in category in the Final Cut Pro X Inspector. It’s a nice set of graphs, numeric data pointers and title bars in the colours just designated as colours of the year by Pantone. The titles are animated and customisable.

You won’t use mInfographics in a feature movie, but if you’re making a documentary or you’re in broadcast and you need to quickly create an infographic with figures and graphics to make the numbers easier to digest, then MotionVFX’s latest addition to the Final Cut Pro X Titles category of plug-ins certainly is a good investment. I can’t think of a faster way to include numerical data in a graphical representation than with mInfographics.

The set contains some 60 or so animated graphics, a couple of headers and captions designed to add descriptive text and some other non-numeric title elements. The idea is that you can either use one of the titles by themselves or stack multiple titles on top of each other to explain a complex matter in an easy way. I first tried using the mInfographics titles by themselves and that worked fine. The design of the titles is modern and some are even futuristic. That gave me the idea to see if I couldn’t do the same with Yanobox Nodes 2, which as many of you know, is a very powerful plug-in when it comes to compositing elements into an infographic – and more.

mInfographics

It turned out that you could theoretically use Nodes 2 for the job, but it would take you much longer to create an infographic that looks as good as the mInfographics titles. For starters, mInfographics is just much easier to work with. For example, a number of diagrams and charts contain sliders to resize the numbers simultaneously with the graphic element that represents them. The clover chart is a fine example. There are four different values in that chart and you can change the values — as well as the size of the leaves — with a slider.

And the idea to stack titles in the Timeline to create a full infographic is just as user-friendly. Because these are just titles, you can also play with built-in Final Cut Pro X video effects such as skewing, decreasing the opacity of the graphic, etc.

However, there are a couple of things I would have liked to see included that aren’t. For example, if you want to create a 3D circle diagram with only three values instead of the default five, you’re out of luck. The circles are connected to the figures and the descriptions with a fine line and it’s impossible to remove or turn invisible those lines (unless I have missed it)UPDATE: mInfographics just got updated and now all rigs and parameters are completely, utterly customisable. Not one chart or diagram anymore that leaves anything desired!

Below you’ll find an example of one of the most simple modules in the mInfographics set.

[videojs mp4=”/media/mInfographics.mp4″ width=”640″ height=”360″]

In other charts, such as the circle block diagram that also has these lines, it is possible to move them out of the frame. That’s perhaps not as elegant as setting their opacity to zero, but it works. To be honest, it’s only a couple of diagrams that you can’t fine-tune enough — at least not to my liking, anyway. Perhaps I’m just being picky.

I probably am, because in terms of design mInfographics is a real charm. In terms of giving you a lot of different chart models to choose from, it’s really complete. And you get to set a good deal of parameters, which allows you to create a chart that you’ll like. Finally, I like the animations as well. mInfographics is also the first MotionVFX plug-in that I installed through their mInstaller — a sort of MotionVFX-only installer annex plug-in/licence management hub.

In short, if you plan to use infographics in videos or on a website, you should at least try out mInfographics. It’s not expensive either, at approx. €63.00.

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